The Fresh Loaf

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Benito's picture
Benito

This loaf was a gift to Alfanso (Alan) and his wife.  We got together for a lovely evening at their place here in Fort Lauderdale last night so I wanted to bring them something different so I came up with the idea to use mashed cooked sweet potato with some cinnamon as a filling for a milk bread.  The baked loaf had some structural issues that made me concerned that it was either overproofed, underbaked (due to the added moisture of the sweet potato) or just too tall to handle its height.

100 g mashed sweet potato

15 g brown sugar

10 g butter

Cook on medium low heat in a pan until it slightly dries.

 

For 1 loaf in a 9x4x4” pullman pan

 

Egg/milk wash: 1 yolk and 1 tbsp milk, beaten

 

Cook Tangzhong mixing flour and milk constantly until it becomes a thick roux.  Let cool before adding to final dough.  Or add to cold milk and egg to cool it down.

 

Blend room temperature butter and flour together and set aside to incorporate after the dough is well developed.

 

Whisk together dry ingredients flour salt and yeast. 

 

To mix by hand, add the salt and yeast to the wet ingredients (milk, tangzhong and egg) to dissolve.  Next add the flour and mix with a silicone spatula until no dry flour remains.  Rest 10 mins.  Next perform French folds until the dough is well developed.  Smear the blended butter/flour onto the dough and then fold to incorporate and then perform further French folds until well developed.  Form into a tight ball and place in a bowl covered with plastic or a damp cloth and place in a warm place until doubled (about 1hr 30 mins).   Place in fridge for 1 hour to firm up the dough to make shaping easier or cold retard until next day.

 

Butter a large baking pan.  Punch the dough down and then divide into 2 equal portions.  Form each into tight boules.  Stretch and then roll each piece of dough into a large rectangle, approximately equal sizes.  Spread the prepared sweet potato evenly over one of of the rectangles of dough leaving about 1cm at the edge of dough without mashed potato.  Place the other rectangle of dough onto the other sandwiching the sweet potato between them.  Using a rolling pin, roll the dough out a bit more aiming for more than 12” in length and just under 9” in width.  

 

Using a ruler and pizza cutter, cut the dough into evenly wide strips about 1.5-2 cm wide along the length of the dough but leaving about 2-4 cm of dough uncut at the end furthest away from you.  When all the strips are cut, twist the strips in alternating directions, clockwise and then counter clockwise.  Once all the strips are twisted, roll the whole thing into a log starting furthest away from you getting a nice tight roll at the start.  Transfer the dough into your prepared pullman pan with the seam side down.

 

Place in the buttered baking pan seem side down.  Cover them and allow them to fully proof about 1 hour to 1 hour and 20-30 mins, it should pass the poke test.

 

After about 30 mins of proofing time, prepare your egg and milk wash and then brush the top of the loaf.

 

About 30 mins prior to end of final proof preheat the oven to 350°F. 

Immediately prior to baking brush the dough again with the egg and milk mixture.

 

Bake the bread for 50 minutes or until the internal temperature is at least 190F. Cover if your loaf gets brown early in the baking process.

 

Remove the bread from the pan and return to the oven baking directly on the rack if the sides of the loaf aren’t yet crisp baking for another 5 mins.  Cool on a rack, enjoy.

The steps to shape this loaf.

After dividing and rolling the two halves of the dough into large rectangles, the sweet potato is spread on one half and then the others is placed on top, rolled out further and finally cut into 1 cm widths leaving one  end of the dough intact.

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MTloaf's picture
MTloaf

The latest twist and shout version of Maura and Martin’s “Don’t be a bread hostage.” I had some cooked rolled oats leftover from breakfast and mixed it in to make a porridge bread. 

  • 720 grams KAAP 
  • 180 grams home milled hard red wheat 
  • 150 grams cooked oat meal
  • 720 grams water (hold back 100 grams to account for water in the oats
  • 18 grams sea salt
  • 36 grams starter fed in the morning 

Mix starter in the water stir then the WW folllowed by the AP flour and rest for 20 minutes. Add the oats and salt a squeeze together plus any additional water to make a loose foldable dough. Do 3 or 4 folds before bedtime. Dough will double in 12 hours at 72 degrees. Divide, rest and shape then refrigerate until ready to bake. 
Porridge breads have always been hit or miss for me. This one ended up slightly over fermented and was sticky, gassy and not easy to shape. Perhaps too much water as well. Extra stitching was required and I was sure it was going to pancake when it went into the oven. However It did firm up in the fridge and held its shape and ended baking up better than I expected. Someone said an over proofed dough will bake better in a hotter oven so that’s what I tried to do.  Although I should have gone for a bolder bake because of the extra hydration. 
Oat bread

Oat crumb
I like the soft crust and custard like crumb and will be making this again! I am now a captive to this way of making bread;-)

Jdgerbs's picture
Jdgerbs

After a long hiatus, I've returned to panettone. I started training a new LM a couple weeks ago and attempted my first bake. This is a 1kilo alto, following the EIDB recipe (with a couple small modifications). I scaled the recipe a little too small and didn't account for mixing loss so I ended up with only a 950g loaf in a 1000g mold. I think I would have had more volume with 1050-1100g. 

My primo still suffered from being overly acidic in terms of PH but it smelled nice and not sour so I went with it. Still working on this. Solving this is the big mystery. 

As always, scouring these forums has helped me learned, so thanks to all for sharing info.

Here are some photos - I use @mwilson recipe for glaze.

Crumb - 

My primo in the mixing bowl

2nd dough after the bench rest 

Glazed after the final proof

 

 

Isand66's picture
Isand66

 

   Who doesn’t like a good English Muffin…toasted with butter or cream cheese?  Nobody that I know of or at least admits to it!  

I’ve made English Muffins many times with varying degrees of success and I have to say this formula is by far my favorite.  It’s adapted from a version I found on King Arthur Flour but with many changes.

I used KAF bread flour along with some fresh milled Whole Wheat using Rouge de Bordeaux berries from Barton Springs Mill.  It is one of my favorite grains I have tried from them.  If you want more info here it the link to the product page.

I used  60% buttermilk along with water in the final mix and added some dried cherries rehydrated in water which gave the final muffins a wonderful flavor.  I probably could have easily increased the amount of cherries to 150 grams and it would made them even better.

The final muffins had a nice English Muffin open crumb filled with nooks and crannies and were extremely flavorful from the buttermilk, SD levain and fresh milled whole wheat flour.  I like to keep a bunch out for the week and then freeze the rest and defrost for 30 seconds in the microwave and toast them up as I need them.

Formula

Levain Directions 

Mix all the levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 6-7 hours or until the starter has almost doubled.  I used my proofer set at 76 degrees so it took around 5 hours for me.  Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

Cherries Preparation

I used dried semi-sweet cherries and soaked them in some water for about an hour.  Drained the water and used it as part of the main dough water.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flour and water/buttermilk  (leave about 50 -70 grams to add after the first mix), together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  After 30 minutes or so  add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces),  honey, and remaining water as needed and mix on low for 5 minutes. Lastly, add in the cherries until they are evenly distributed for about a minute.  Note: If you are using the Ankarsrum mixer like I do, add your water to the bowl first then add in the flours.  After your autolyse add in the starter, salt, remaining water and mix on low to medium low for 15-20 minutes.  Add the cherries in in the last minute of mixing.

Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 2 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for one hour or so.    Remove the dough and roll out on a lightly floured countertop to about 1/2″ to 3/4″ thickness depending on how thick you want your English Muffins.  Cut them with a circular metal cutter to the size you desire and place them on a cookie sheet with parchment paper sprinkled with cornmeal.  Cover them with a damp tea towel or plastic wrap sprayed with cooking spray to avoid sticking.  Let them proof in a warm place for 1-2 hours depending until they pass the poke test.  Make sure not to over proof them or you will end up with hockey pucks.

I use an electric skillet to cook mine and warm it up to 375-400 F.  I spray some canola cooking spray in the skillet and after placing the English Muffins inside I place the cover on top which creates a perfect steamy environment. I flip them over once they start getting nice and brown on the bottom and let them cook another few minutes before taking them out to cool on a wire rack.  Use a fork to split them open to keep the nice open crumb, toast them nice and dark and slather on your favorite condiment.

trailrunner's picture
trailrunner

I wanted to see how this would work with really old stored starter and a substantial amount of fresh milled whole wheat. Worked beautifully! 

My stored YW starter hasn’t been refreshed in I don’t know how long… maybe months. I milled 400g of a generic WW . I used 40 g of the stored starter and for good measure subbed 200g of stored Apple YW for part of the water. 

 Mixed everything in the KA til no dry parts. Let autolyse for 30 min. Turned on KA speed 1 , rather than do folds , for 1 min x 3. Bulked at room temp 70 degrees for 9 hours. That’s when I woke up and checked and it had at least tripled. Ok… stuck it in the fridge and went back to bed. 

Took out dumped on countertop at 8 AM it was very soft and spread so I did a couple folds and shaped placed in floured cloth lined bannetons and right back into fridge. 

4 pm turned out scored and baked per Another Girl’s post. I used her weights for everything. 

This bread is delicious! Crust is very chewy and the crumb is very soft and chewy . Quite like a good ciabatta. Really happy with it. Amazing open crumb for 40% WW. 

jl's picture
jl

I don't consume a whole lot of white bread, but I've been fascinated by the 90% biga loaf recipe for quite a while now. I've been making 50% biga bread every once in a while, but yesterday decided to try it again to see whether increasing the hydration would help get rid of the lumps.

When pre-fermenting only 50% of the flower, I usualy just leave the bowl on the counter. This one I tried to make by the book: dissolve yeast in water, pour over flour, shake.

It's not supposed to rise a whole lot. After 14h @ 14 °C it looked like this:

 

I kneaded it in the mixer (Kitchenaid with a spiral dough hook) at this point to incorporate all the dry flour. Then I added some water to get to 65% hydration. After that I added 5% at a time all the way to 80%. At 75% the lumps were barely noticable and they disappeared entirely at 80% hydration. The dough was fairly loose at this point. Had to fold the dough puddle immediately:

With a 50% biga the dough feels quite a bit stronger, but with enough folds this is becomes manageable:

 

Was expecting shaping to be more difficult.

The hardest part about this is deciding when to bake it. The dough has no structure if divided too early. It would be impossible to shape. When divided late, there are so many large bubbles trapped inside, it's hard to tell if it's past peak gas retention point. I think these could have proofed a bit longer.

The best thing about a biga is that no matter what you do, it always seems to produce a tall loaf.

To be perfectly honest, I don't think I could tell a difference between a 50% and a 90% biga loaf, tastewise. 50% biga bread is more cottony, while this feels a little more like enriched bread. Need to come up with a way to compare them side by side.

 

 

 

 

HeiHei29er's picture
HeiHei29er

My first use of teff flour came during our Gluten Free Community Bake.  Comments made here intrigued me, and I finally got around to experimenting.

To get a good taste of the teff flour, I kept the recipe simple.  I created a teff flour starter over a 3-day period by using my white flour starter and then doing a 1:4:4 refresh every 8 hours.  From there, I used my standard sourdough loaf approach but used a 100% teff flour levain for the 15% prefermented flour.

As Gina mentioned in her comment, the teff flour goes through a range of aromas as it ferments.  It is actually quite sweet smelling after maybe 5-6 hours and then gets noticeably tangy sour after 8+ hours.  Even though it was 100% teff flour in the levain, it had no trouble with wheat flour and leavened the dough right on target with a 15% PFF taking about 4 hours to reach 75-80% volume increase at 76 deg F.

As expected with 15% gluten free flour, the crumb is even/closed, but is not at all dense.  It is moist but not gummy.  The teff almost has a shortening effect.  The taste of the loaf is excellent!  Whole grain, nutty flavors/aromas.

Levain
67.5g    Teff flour
64.1g    Water
9g         Teff starter
Combine and ferment at 70 deg F for 12 hours

Final Dough
225g    All Purpose Flour
157.5g Bread Flour
228.4g Water
9g        Salt

1)   Excluding salt, combine final dough ingredients with levain until just wet
2)   Fermentolyse 20 minutes
3)   Fold in salt and any bassinage water (if needed).  Use Pinch and Squeeze to fully mix.  Bowl knead until dough comes back together.  Rest 10 minutes.
4)   Three sets of bowl kneading with 10 minute rests
5)   Bulk ferment at 76 deg F.  Folds every 30-45 minutes until "puffy".  Preshape at 75-80% rise
6)   Preshape at rest 20 minutes
7)   Final proof at 76 deg F
8)   Preheat oven to 465 deg F with oven setup for steam
9)   Bake with steam at 465 deg F (2 minutes); 400 deg F (18 minutes); vent oven; 435 deg F (15-20 minutes); bake until hollow thump

CalBeachBaker's picture
CalBeachBaker

Today's bake: Semolina Bread

Bread - A Baker's Book of Techniques and Recipes - Jeffery Hamelman 2nd Ed.

This bread is made from a majority of fresh ground durum wheat along with bread flour and a bit of whole rye which is in the culture. This is my first time making as well as tasting a semolina bread. The durum has a really nice nutty flavor that makes the sesame seeds really stand out. I baked this 2 mins longer than optimal which I've adjusted in the process section. I really like this bread and will definitely make it again.

Tasting Notes

Crumb - Sweet/Dairy with notes of butter

Crust - Toasty with notes of malt and nuts

Grain Character - moderate with a taste of cooked spaghetti

Recipe and Process are below for those that are interested.

 

 

 

 

Isand66's picture
Isand66

 

 I wanted to try  another new grain I purchased from Barton Springs Mill called Butler’s Gold Whole Wheat.  The whole wheat berries are harvested from a small farm in Texas.  It’s supposed to be a good neutral flavored whole wheat perfect for mixing with other stronger flours.  I decided to use this exclusively and only mixed it with a small amount of BF.  I did use KAF BF in the Levain so overall it ended up being a  50% WW bread.  I milled the Butler’s Gold berries to a high extraction sifting and milling twice.

I was very happy with the final outcome on this one.  The Butler’s gold flour had a nice buttery earthy taste profile and the crumb was moderately open.  I really enjoyed using this to make some grilled cheese sandwiches and it made some nice toast as well.

Formula

Levain Directions 

Mix all the levain ingredients together for about 1 minute and cover with plastic wrap.  Let it sit at room temperature for around 6-7 hours or until the starter has almost doubled.  I used my proofer set at 76 degrees so it took around 5 hours for me.  Either use in the main dough immediately or refrigerate for up to 1 day before using.

 Main Dough Procedure

Mix the flour and water (leave about 50 -70 grams to add after the first mix), together in your mixer or by hand until it just starts to come together, maybe about 1 minute.  Let it rest in your work bowl covered for 20-30 minutes.  After 30 minutes or so  add the salt, starter (cut into about 7-8 pieces),  and olive oil, and remaining water as needed and mix on low for 5 minutes.   Note: If you are using the Ankarsrum mixer like I do, add your water to the bowl first then add in the flours.  After your autolyse add in the starter, salt, remaining water and mix on low to medium low for 15-20 minutes.

Remove the dough from your bowl and place it in a lightly oiled bowl or work surface and do several stretch and folds.  Let it rest covered for 10-15 minutes and then do another stretch and fold.  Let it rest another 10-15 minutes and do one additional stretch and fold.  After a total of 1.5 hours place your covered bowl in the refrigerator and let it rest for 12 to 24 hours.

When you are ready to bake remove the bowl from the refrigerator and let it set out at room temperature still covered for 1.5 to 2 hours or if using a proofer set at 80 degrees for one hour.  Remove the dough and shape as desired and cover with a moist tea towel or plastic wrap Sprayed with cooking spray and let rise at room temperature for 1 1/2 – 2 hours.  (I use my proofer set at 80 F and it takes about 1 hour to 1.5 hours).

Around 45 minutes before ready to bake, pre-heat your oven to 500 degrees F. and prepare it for steam.  I have a heavy-duty baking pan on the bottom rack of my oven with 1 baking stone on above the pan and one on the top shelf.  I pour 1 cup of boiling water in the pan right after I place the dough in the oven.

After 1 minute lower the temperature to 450 degrees.  Bake for around 35 minutes or until the breads are nice and brown and have an internal temperature around 200-210 F. 

Take the bread(s) out of the oven when done and let them cool on a bakers rack for as long as you can resist. 

SueVT's picture
SueVT

Panettone can be made is a wide variety of flavors, not just the classic raisins and candied orange peel. In this case, I used apple chunks, caramel bits, and cider donut spices, which combine beautifully with the light buttery and fermentation notes of the panettone.

 

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