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low carb multigrain bread

sbwertz's picture
sbwertz

low carb multigrain bread

Multigrain Bread

Note: Because these breads have no preservatives, be sure to keep them in the refrigerator.  Important, make sure you have FRESH yeast!

 

(I have shown the WPI and Carbquik in grams because I have found it is difficult to get consistent measurements with measuring cups.)

 

1/2 tsp salt

1/4 cup wheat protein isolate 8000 (33g)

2 cups Carbquik (215 g) 

1/2 cup wheat protein isolate 5000 (74g)

2 tbsp Resistant Wheat Starch 75

3/4 cup ground pecans

2 tbsp wheat bran

1 tbsp Thick it Up

1 tbsp baking powder

1 tbsp blackstrap molasses (sugar eaten by yeast, flavor remains.)

1 tbsp yeast

 

1 cup warm water

1/4 cup heavy cream

2 large eggs

Artificial sweetener equal to 1/4 cup sugar (I use liquid sucralose)

 

Multigrains:

1/4 cup sliced almonds or chopped pecans or walnuts

1/4 cup raw sunflower seeds, coarsely chopped

1 tbsp sesame seeds

2 tbsp flax seed

2 tbsp chia seed

 

Set the breadmaker to manual mode.

 

Combine all the dry ingredient except the multigrains in the pan of the breadmaker. Then put the wet ingredients in a mixing bowl. Mix the wet ingredients well and warm them in the microwave for 30 seconds.

 

Turn on the breadmaker and let the dry ingredients mix for a few seconds, and then pour in the wet ingredients. (If using a stand mixer, mix for 1 minute with the paddle, then 10 minutes with the dough hook.) The dough will be too soft at first, but will firm up and make a ball after it kneads for a few minutes. If the dough is too stiff, and breaks into more than one ball, add a little more water. If it is too soft and won’t form a ball, add a little more WPI 5000. If your breadmaker has a “raisin beep” about ten minutes before the end of the kneading cycle, add the multigrains then. Otherwise, just add them close to the end of the cycle. (If you add them at the beginning of the cycle, they tend to break down into the dough and you want them to still be whole in the baked loaf.)

 

Don't let the dough rise in the breadmaker. Take it out as soon as the knead cycle ends and knead it a few times to make sure the add-ins are thoroughly mixed in. Form the dough and put it in a greased bread pan and set in a warm place to rise. If you let it rise twice it will ruin it.

 

When the dough reaches the top of the pan, bake it in a preheated 350 degree oven for 40 minutes until golden brown. (Because of the baking powder in the recipe, the dough “kicks” in the oven and will rise another inch or two, so don’t let it rise too high before baking) Turn the loaf out on to a rack to cool.

             

Yields 16 half inch slices per loaf, 2.5g carbs per slice

pmccool's picture
pmccool

And I don't say that with any malice whatsoever.  It is purely a matter of personal taste.

Actually, I'm impressed that this bakes up into something that looks bread-like.  You've definitely pushed the envelope with this formula.  How does it taste/feel in the mouth?

Paul

sbwertz's picture
sbwertz

Here is what it looks like, and it tastes like bread!  This is pumpernickel and "wheat" which has ground pecans.

.

KathyF's picture
KathyF

I haven't heard of wheat protein isolate before. I looked it up and it looks like a more refined version of vital wheat gluten. Is it stronger than vital wheat gluten, or is the texture different? When I was on a low carb diet, I tried baking a loaf of bread that had a lot of vital wheat gluten and ended up with a very chewy, sponge like texture. What is the texture like with your recipe?

sbwertz's picture
sbwertz

There are two types of wheat protein isolate.  The wpi 5000 is a flour substitute...it is wheat flour that has had the carbs and fat removed, leaving only the protein...gluten and other proteins.

The wpi 8000 is a dough conditioner.  It is a different blend of wheat proteins that gives the bread a chewy "European" texture.  If you prefer the "wonderbread" texture, sub 5000 for the 8000 in the recipe. (I use all 5000 for hamburger buns because it makes them easier to bite into.  With 8000 they are more like chewy, crusty kaiser rolls.) 

The texture is like real bread.  The mouth feel is like real bread!  It toasts well, and makes great french toast.  It makes great bread crumbs for cooking.

The only place I have found the wpi is online at netrition.  Vital wheat gluten just doesn't work the same.  Wpi contains vwg, but it also contains other proteins found in wheat.

Without the multigrains it makes a great pizza crust, too.  Since I'm hypoglycemic and my husband is insulin dependent diabetic, we had been without bread for a LONG time.  It is so nice to have it back in our diet.  It took me several years to perfect the recipes, but now they are pretty darn close to "real" bread.

 

Sharon

KathyF's picture
KathyF

Thank you Sharon. My brother is diabetic and tries to stick to a low carb diet. It would be nice if I could bake a nice low carb loaf of bread. Thanks so much for the recipe and information.

Farzana's picture
Farzana

Are they supposed to have a "sour" smell to them ?  I purchased both 8000 and 5000 and they both seem to have a sour smell once mixed in water. 

sbwertz's picture
sbwertz

I've never noticed a sour smell, but then I've been using WPI for so many years, that maybe I just don't notice it.  There is definitely not a sour taste or smell to the finished product.  I've served it to many people who are not low carb and they have all liked it.

 

 

Captain ET's picture
Captain ET

Thanks for posting this interesting recipe! I may try it! Wish I could do this whole thing in my breadmaker though. I don't have a manual setting. (Cuisinart CBK100). Does anyone know what the difference is between vital wheat gluten (VWG) and VWG FLOUR?

sbwertz's picture
sbwertz

To the best of my knowledge, they are two terms that refer to the same product.  You can sub VWG for wpi 5000, but it will increase the carb count, and change the texture somewhat. 

Put the ingredients in your bread maker and turn it on.  Set a timer for 10 minutes.  Turn your oven on at its lowest setting for a few minutes to warm it up, then turn on the oven light and turn off the oven.  The light will keep it warm enough to raise the bread. 

When the timer goes off, take the dough out, knead it by hand a little bit to shape it, and put it in a bread pan. (I prefer glass over metal pans,)  Put it in the oven and set a timer for 20 minutes.  Check the bread.  If it has not reached the top of the pan, reset the timer for 10 more minutes.  Don't let it rise much above the sides of the pan because it will kick about an inch to an inch and a half when you put it in the hot oven.

When it has risen to the top of the pan, take it out and preheat the oven to 350 degrees.  Return the pan to the oven and bake 40 minutes.  Turn out on a rack to cool.  Keep it in the refrigerator, because it has no preservatives and will start to grow green fuzz if kept at room temp for more than a few days.  It freezes well. 

For hamburger buns or dinner rolls, sub another 1/4 cup of WPI 5000 for the 1/4 cup of WPI 8000,  (The 8000 is a dough conditioner that produces a chewier, "European" type crust.  It makes the buns too crusty/chewy to bite into for a hamburger bun.)  Using all 5000 makes it more like store-bought hamburger buns, with a softer crust.

MaterWitch's picture
MaterWitch

This bread sounds  fabulous! I want to try this, as I have all the ingredients on hand,  but are the ground pecans finely ground like flour, or just ground coarsely.

sbwertz's picture
sbwertz

I grind it fine, about like stone ground wheat, which it is replacing.

sbwertz's picture
sbwertz

wheat protein isolate is not the same as VWG.  VWG has 14 g carbs per 100 g.  Wheat protein has 0.  

Leo867's picture
Leo867

Two things if you don't mind.  can I substitute almond or coconut flour for ground pecans?  Also, will maple  syrup work instead of black strap molasses?  Thanks

sbwertz's picture
sbwertz

It would be better to sub more wheat bran for the pecans. If you omit the pecans and wheat bran it makes a great white bread.   Maple syrup can be used.  It provides the sugar to feed the yeast.

aniyahqueen's picture
aniyahqueen

I’m brand new to bread-making and I really want to try this bread, but I’m highly sensitive to dairy. It’s easy to sub out the heavy cream on its own, but carbquik includes buttermilk powder :( it seems like a pretty integral part of the recipe given the amount used... so I’m wondering if there is anything else I could use, or if I’m out of luck in that regard? 

 Thank you for any suggestions!

sbwertz's picture
sbwertz

Sorry I can't help you.  I spent several years perfecting this recipe, and I've always used carbquik.  You can try a different low carb flower blend, but I don't know how it will affect the results.  The carbquik and the cream provide the fat in the recipe, so you will have to add fat back in as well.  Just make sure you use fresh yeast.  

peter fulvi's picture
peter fulvi

Why would you only be able to use fresh yeast?Is there a conversion for instant yeast

David R's picture
David R

Just my individual opinion, but recipes like this one (i.e. recipes for a very specific non-standard purpose, using a significant proportion of non-standard ingredients, and painstakingly developed by a particular individual over considerable time) are better to just follow without substitutions. The purpose is very focused. If your purpose is a little different, you probably didn't want such a recipe anyway.

 

That said, the usual conversion would be to take the fresh yeast amount and divide it by 3 to get a close-enough amount of instant yeast. Active dry yeast (non instant) tends to turn out more yeasty-tasting and is harder to use, so I wouldn't recommend it unless it's all you've ever used.

[In this particular recipe, 1 tablespoon divided by 3 happens to exactly equal 1 teaspoon, so at least it's convenient. ?]

sbwertz's picture
sbwertz

When I say fresh yeast, I mean freshly bought, not having set in your cupboard for weeks or months.  I use instant yeast, but it loses it's "oomph" over time.  If you don't bake regularly, you would do best to buy it in small quantities.  Even kept in the freezer, it will lose potency over time.  

David R's picture
David R

Oh!!!

"Fresh yeast" is taken to mean "wet, perishable bricks of yeast like bakeries use"

You should definitely change the wording of your recipe so people don't misunderstand. Maybe say "1 tablespoon instant yeast - make sure it's in good condition and not too old". Something like that, whatever works - but don't say "fresh yeast", because it's the name of something you didn't want.

peter fulvi's picture
peter fulvi

I had the best results with this recipe so far concerning low carb breads. The fact that the yeast has somewhat of a food source really helps with the rise time. This gives me a good Base formula to work with. Thanks.

peter fulvi's picture
peter fulvi

I am a type 1 diabetic actively fighting type 1 diabetes and studying nutrition this has been a joy to find this recipe. I also am a baker. I have missed bread but not the glycemic spikes that follow it, so this is a treat. I contacted LC Foods to see if they would give me a recipe to work with but of course it was a no. So i tracked the ingredients the used which led me to find a recipe online. This is a very well developed recipe. I just made a braided loaf  with it. Keep up the good work